Monday, December 29, 2008


New Years is the time that most people begin to set their resolutions. If you find yourself repeating the same "resolution", the fault may be in the way you are setting the goal. Goals should be stated in the positive. Don't say, "I want to stop eating sweets" or "I no longer want to be fat." The mind will have to process the negative in order to understand the goal. It is like that old joke: tell someone “don’t think of a pink elephant.” Now you know that all the listener has to do is create an image of a pink elephant. If you say to yourself: "I no longer want to be fat," your mind will first form the idea of being fat, before it can reverse the image. In essence you are saying “I want to be …” and now the mind creates an image of you, fat. Your mind will deliver what it thinks you want. Did you know that neurotransmitters bathe every cell in the body? Every thought affects every cell in your body. The adult brain contains approximately 100 billion neurons, interconnected in a vast, dynamic network. There are trillions of possible neurological connections in the body. So each time you generate the thought about being fat, you affect your brain physiology; your mind will try to turn this image into reality. It typically gives it to you in the form of an action. Your mind will take you in the direction you picture, whether it's positive or negative, so frame your goal with a positive picture. Take action by asking yourself what you want, and then focus on that instead.
Imagine your goal is a set of bowling pins. The gutters are there, and if you focus on them, you will wind up watching a series of gutter balls. Good bowlers focus all of their attention on the pins they want to hit. In much in the same way, successful people focus all their attention on the goals they want to achieve.